the_judas_drone (the_judas_drone) wrote,
the_judas_drone
the_judas_drone

Oh the William Blakery of it all!

Seriosuly though, some of the stuff is starting to freak me out. The four zoas are really messing with me, that round cube object floating in space - almost like it's trying to impose itself on our concept of reality, the book of Ahania, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, you read enough Blake, and it really makes you start to question things, in an uncomfortable, squeamish way. Some of his art work is just inspiriing in that breathy way, when you start to fold the details, poems, and words around in your mind, other stuff really, really gives you that horrible feeling of the uncanny in your gut.

In particular this.

Photobucket

I’ve been having nightmares about this image.

Seriously I can’t get it out of my mind. The platonic aspects of the cave itself, the sun as distant knowledge, or the true reality that makes all the other forms of reality real, in the Platonic sense, yet the utter impossible, despairing, unobtainable nature of it - worse the three characters locked together, in ‘this’ reality, and Oh God, the look, the utter fear on Bromion’s face. That shocked madness, like he has seen through this world and into the something else.

This is something I turned up in the discussion, which really creeped me out, and has literally been giving me nightmares.
_______

You see the way Bromion is looking beyond the frame, Marie? How traumatized his face is at seeing something beyond our vision, some unknown force, or object that is not of this world, something of the elsewhere?

Look at the contortion of facial features, the eyes, the way the knees are brought together to protect the genitals. In fear, he looks as though retreating from it, like he is pushing his body up against Oothoon, and yet is unable to look away, caught in the stark horror of whatever he sees, but is hidden from the rest of us.

And this same haunting verse, over and over

Then Bromion said, and shook the cavern with his lamentation:--

`Thou knowest that the ancient trees seen by thine eyes have fruit;
But knowest thou that trees and fruits flourish upon the earth
To gratify senses unknown -- trees, beasts, and birds unknown;
Unknown, not unperceiv'd, spread in the infinite microscope,
In places yet unvisited by the voyager, and in worlds
Over another kind of seas, a 1000 nd in atmospheres unknown?
Ah! are there other wars, beside the wars of sword and fire?
And are there other sorrows beside the sorrows of poverty?
And are there other joys beside the joys of riches and ease?
And is there not one law for both the lion and the ox?
And is there not eternal fire, and eternal chains
To bind the phantoms of existence from eternal life?'" -

Each part, each utterance is a strange haunting when you read it:

- "Thou knowest that the ancient trees seen by thine eyes have fruit;
But knowest thou that trees and fruits flourish upon the earth
To gratify senses unknown -- trees, beasts, and birds unknown;
Unknown, not unperceiv'd, spread in the infinite microscope," -

What are these fruits, what are these things unseen? What strange realities lay beyond the infinite microscope, what horrors are there beyond the senses, what birds, beasts, and animals are in the unknown, what has he seen there that would cause him to react to Theotormon's inner withdrawal and sufferings so much?

Theotorman (which illicits Bromion's speech) -

"Tell me what is a thought, and of what substance is it made?
Tell me what is a joy, and in what gardens do joys grow?
And in what rivers swim the sorrows? And upon what mountains
Wave shadows of discontent? And in what houses dwell the wretched,
Drunken with woe, forgotten, and shut up from cold despair?"

But this second part of Bromion's speech is so much stranger, and much more haunting still.

- "In places yet unvisited by the voyager, and in worlds
Over another kind of seas, a 1000 nd in atmospheres unknown?
Ah! are there other wars, beside the wars of sword and fire?
And are there other sorrows beside the sorrows of poverty?
And are there other joys beside the joys of riches and ease?
And is there not one law for both the lion and the ox?"

And what is this last part, which seems to talk almost of hell on earth, and contains the faintest, reference to the image itself, and their fettered form, within the Cave.

- "And is there not eternal fire, and eternal chains
To bind the phantoms of existence from eternal life?' " -

_______

Obviously his arcane knowledge is a knowledge of reality, a Nietzschian universe that apposes the kind of soft love, and the inner longing inside of Oothoon, and thus he draws his power to dominate her through an understanding that the physical universe functions by violence, and that physical might, poverty, and suffering are inescapable conditions of existence in whatever form life takes, - but what about these references to extra-terrestrial spirits and other atmospheres? Extra sensory perceptions, and what not?

Here are some interesting extracts from Swedenborg's Earths In The Starry Heavens - what do you make of them, particularly the last one.

89. On one occasion when spirits of Mars were with me, and occupied the sphere of my mind, spirits from our Earth came and desired to intrude themselves also into that sphere; but the spirits of our Earth became as if insane: this was caused by their being quite out of harmony; for the spirits of our Earth in the Grand Man have relation to the external sense,

72 . . . When such spirits come to a man, they inspire him with a horror accompanied by fear, by which the man is made aware of their coming. Fear may be excited in any person by evil spirits on their approach, especially by those who, during their life in the world, had been robbers. In order that I might know how these spirits act when they come to a man of their own earth, it was permitted that such a spirit should approach me. When he was near, horror accompanied by fear manifestly seized hold of me; yet it was not inwardly that I shuddered, but outwardly, because I knew it was a spirit of such a character.

102. Inasmuch as the spirits of our Earth, in the Grand Man, have relation to natural and corporeal sense, it has been given me to know from manifest experience how the spiritual and the natural man, when the latter is not in faith and charity, fight and contend with each other. Some spirits of the earth Saturn came into view from afar, and then a living communication was opened between them and spirits of our Earth who were of this character. These latter, on thus perceiving the spirits of Saturn, became as if insane, and began to infest them,

_______________

So what do you make of the unearthly references in the image of the cave, with Bromion looking out, beyond the image, as though something beyond the reference of the picture's frame has absolutely shocked him, then his little speech of other worlds, and objects of other perceptions we can not know, and violence as a universal law, and the selections from Swedenborg that talk about violent being from other worlds driving men on earth insane?

_______

If I stare at the image to long, this particular inking of the Cave itself, I get a shudder. I get one of those horrible momentary shivers of paranoia. If you look at it, I mean really look at it, it feels like you are being watched.

I don’t know why. It just does.
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